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Travel and Leisure – December 2013

Best of LA Winners - Best Regional Indian Vegetarian

Informal chaat houses, serving salty and sweet treats like bhel puri (puffed rice, potatoes, and onions in tamarind sauce) and barfi (a condensed-milk and sugar dessert) are an institution in India. Meet their L.A. counterpart: Surati Farsan Mart, a casual market and café specializing in authentic vegetarian street food. You’ll find it in Artesia, a suburb commonly known as SoCal’s Little India. If it’s a bit of a hike, you can always order heaping trays of sweets”

Los Angeles Times Magazine – August 2012

Best of LA Winners - Best Regional Indian Vegetarian

“Well-prepared vegetarian choices abound in Little India, but at Surati Farsan Mart, the newly expanded Gujarati chaat house, the small plates rival those at any tony temple of modern cuisine. Dahi puri are fragile puffs laden with potato and yogurt. Garbanzo flour dhokla, showered with seeds and cilantro, is as airy as chiffon cake. A crackly exterior surrounds kachori's sweet pea filling, and the light curries might include freshly shelled vaal, or papdi lilva, beans. Lime pickles made in-house taste like nothing found in a jar.”

Los Angeles Times Magazine – August 2011
“Those who love the light, snacky Indian meals called chat can get their bhel-puri or dahi-vada fix at any number of places. Surati Farsan Mart provides a refined version of vegetarian specialties seasoned with the tastes of Gujarat State in western India.”

AmericanWay (American Airlines Magazine) - January 2011

Street Scene: Pioneer Boulevard, Artesia, Calif.

“For casual dining and sweets, there’s Surati Farsan Mart, just off the main drag. Sometimes the line of eager diners waiting to get in here stretches out almost to Pioneer.”

Food & Wine Magazine – June 2000

International Bytes

A hungry shopper finds the best Web sites for ethnic foods

INDIAN:Best specialty site:

This Los Angeles-area dessert and snack shop is highly regarded by the city's Indian community. Its Web site sells exotic Indian sweets made in the store, such as ghari (a pistachio-and-cashew confection), badam barfi (almond candy) and choorma ladoo (cream-of-wheat balls), as well as snacks, including papdi gathiya (gram-flour chips) and chevdo (rice puffs mixed with peanuts and raisins).

Ease of use: The site supplies detailed product descriptions and some photographs, which are helpful for the uninitiated.

Bottom line: Most items are reasonably priced, between $5 and $7 a pound, and my box of sweets arrived promptly.

Food & Wine Magazine – May 1999

Wise Guides

“Los Angeles - Must eat:The crisp, savory pancake known as khandvi made at Surati Farsan Mart. "The cooks simmer yogurt and chickpea flour together for about 45 minutes, spread it flat and roll it up. Then they season it with sizzled mustard seeds and garnish it with fresh coconut and cilantro. It's incredibly time-consuming and absolutely divine." Another specialty is a snack from the western state of Gujarat called pani puri--a small puffy bread the size of a Ping-Pong ball filled with vegetables, chutney, mint and water. (Yes, water.) "You pop it in your mouth and end up with this wonderful feeling: crisp cold water, cumin, tamarind, a hint of chili--all these lovely flavors. I'm going to be introducing this dish at my restaurant soon."

AAA Westways – January / February 2011
“At Surati Farsan Mart, the menu of spicy, savory, and sweet Indian snacks is as inexpensive as it is exhaustive; try the dosas, which are like crispy crepes.”

San Diego Magazine – June 2012

San Diego Best Restaurants 2012

Critics Pick’s

Best Indian:Surati Farsan

San Diego Magazine – June 2011

San Diego Best 2011 Restaurants

Critics Pick’s

Best Indian:Surati Farsan

San Diego Magazine – February 2011

The Main Dish

Masala Dosa at Surati Farsan Mart

“It’s fun to make a meal from the dizzying array of Indian snacks, both savory and sweet, and other small dishes at this casual eatery in Miramar Road’s Little India Center. Most of these all-vegetarian items are worth a taste, especially the masala dosa, a crisp cylindrical crepe made from a light batter of rice and lentils that’s wrapped around a mildly spicy filling of onions and potatoes flavored with mustard seeds, tumeric and chili pepper. It’s served with bowl of sambar, a vegetable stew, and a thin cilantro-coconut chutney. If you like things even hotter, try the Mysore Masala Dosa, a triangular-shaped version with the extra addition of garlic-red chili chutney.”